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Lectures

2013/2014

Tuesday 15th April 2014
William Kent and his Portraits of the Servants at Kensington Palace
Dr Lucy Worsley

The King's grand staircase at Kensington Palace was decorated in the 1720s by William Kent, and included portraits of forty-five real servants. This talk uncovers for the first time the identity of many of Kent's sitters, and gives their unique, below-stairs view of life in an eighteenth-century royal palace.

Lucy is returning to Norwich DFAS where she was extremely well received, and is also well known as a television presenter. She is Chief Curator at the Historic Royal Palaces, has worked for English Heritage, and is the author of two books.

William Kent and his Portraits of the Servants at Kensington Palace

Staircase at Kensington Palace
Tuesday 18th March 2014
Habitat Catalogued
Caroline MacDonald-Haig

In 1964 Terence Conran opened the first Habitat shop in London's Chelsea. Habitat's colour and quirky take on contemporary design chimed with Swinging London. He revolutionized British retailing. From the beginning Conran spread the word of this now classic lifestyle working with some of the best designers, art directors and photographers to produce his iconic catalogue.

Caroline is a design and decorative arts journalist and author as well as being a London Blue Badge guide, specialising in tours for museums and art galleries. In the early 70s she worked for Terence Conran copy writing and editing the Habitat Catalogue.

Habitat Catalogued
Tuesday 18th February 2014
Travel Broadens the Mind: Artists and their Travels from Van Eyck to Gauguin
Clare Ford-Wille

We will explore the lure of travel and its impact upon the work of artists from the Renaissance to the l9th century. Van Eyck went to Burgundy, Bruegel to Italy, and Rubens to Spain; later artists travelled further outside Europe. How did these travels transform the work of artists and introduce new ideas?

Clare has an honours degree in History of Art, at Birkbeck College, University of London and her regular commitments include the National Gallery and the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Travel Broadens the Mind: Artists and their Travels from Van Eyck to Gauguin

Tahitian Mountains by Gauguin
Tuesday 21st January 2014
The Art of London: A Pictorial Tour of London's Street Art
and Statues that both Charm and Amuse
Peter Lawrence

A light-hearted pictorial tour of our capital looking at street art, statues and architecture both classical and not so classical. We will see memorials to great events and people that will both provoke and amuse, as will examples of quality graffiti observed over many years of guiding in London.

Peter is a retired member of Royalty and Diplomatic Protection at Scotland Yard and an adult education tutor of Architectural History and Social Studies. He is also a Freeman of the City of London and author and broadcaster on London history.

The Art of London: A Pictorial Tour of London's Street Art

Banksy
Tuesday 10th December 2013
Christmas social event 6.00pm. There is a charge for the buffet at 6.00pm
but the lecture at 7.00pm is free to all members.
Wonder Workers and the Art of Illusion: The History of Magic through Art and Pictures
Bertie Pearce

Egypt was the ancient cradle of magic and this talk will trace this age old skill up to the period of Music Hall and the feats of The Great Illusionists. You may be amazed and bewitched!

Bertie has a BA (Hons) in Drama from Manchester University, and a Diploma Internationale from the École Internationale du Théatre, Jacques Lecoq. He is also a member of the Inner Magic Circle, with Gold Star.

Wonder Workers and the Art of Illusion: The History of Magic through Art and Pictures

Conjuror by Hieronymus Bosch
Tuesday 19th November 2013
It will never show! Designing Historical Costumes for Film and Television
Anna Buruma

As a costume designer, Anna Buruma was fortunate enough to be involved in several rather special period productions ranging from one set in 15th century France to one set in 1930s Hollywood. She will talk about helping to make these productions work, showing both the problems and the fun this involved.

Anna is making a welcome return. During the 1990s she graduated with an art history MA from the Courtauld Institute. Since 1995 has been the archivist at Liberty. She has published various articles on dress and a book on historical costume.

It will never show! Designing Historical Costumes for Film and Television
Tuesday 15th October 2013 after the AGM
Verdi's 'La Traviata': A Very Italian Affair
Jonathan Hinden

A non-technical and not-too-serious account of this masterpiece, its characters and story, with musical illustrations on the piano, focusing on the composer's ability to express character and mood through music, and with a brief look at the circumstances and context of its composition.

Jonathan was a principal coach at Glyndebourne Opera and head of music staff until 1997; he has worked as keyboard player and conductor for Glyndbourne Touring Opera, Kent Opera and English Touring Opera. He has also taught at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, the Royal Academy of Music, the National Opera Studio and the Advanced Performers' Studio.

Verdi's 'La Traviata': A Very Italian Affair

Tuesday 17th September 2013
Our 30th Birthday will be celebrated this evening.
A Crisis of Brilliance: Young British Artists 1908–1919
Dr David Boyd Haycock

This lecture follows a trip to Dulwich Picture Gallery in the summer. In the years leading up to the First World War, the Slade School of Art was the leading establishment in England for teaching of drawing and painting. Its students included some of the most important British artists of the first half of the twentieth century, including David Bomberg, Dora Carrington, Mark Gertler, Paul Nash, C.R.W. Nevinson, William Roberts, Stanley Spencer and Edward Wadsworth.

David read modern history at Oxford and has an MA in art history from the University of Sussex and a doctorate from University of London. He is the author of the book of the same title and one reviewer said "Haycock's narrative of this entangled, war-defined group is so strong that it often has the force of a novel, hard to put down."



Paul Nash, The Menin Road
Tuesday 18th June 2013
The Odd Couple: The Gardens of Edwin Lutyens and Gertrude Jekyll
Steven Desmond

The partnership of the young architect and the gardener, a generation older than Lutyens, was an unlikely one but their joint creations of house and garden became the talk of Edwardian society, setting a standard of excellence which has been admired ever since.

Steven is an Independent landscape consultant specialising in historic gardens and architecture as well as a writer and broadcaster on this subject. He is a freelance lecturer, and has lectured at the universities of Bristol and Oxford.

The Odd Couple: The Gardens of Edwin Lutyens and Gertrude Jekyll
Tuesday 21st May 2013
A Thousand Years of History: Medieval Cathedrals as Time Machines
Jon Cannon

The lecture looks at medieval cathedrals as 'time machines' and traces the history and architecture of English cathedrals from Norman times, through the Gothic period, to the late medieval era and explores the historical background that shaped them.

The author of "Cathedral: the Great English Cathedrals", Jon written for many publications including for English Heritage. He is a part-time lecturer in the History of Art at the University of Bristol and holds a degree in the History of Art from the University of Sussex.

A Thousand Years of History: Medieval Cathedrals as Time Machines

Salisbury Cathedral