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Newsletter - Spring 2015

 

Renewal of Membership

Members should have all received forms from Jane France, our membership secretary; please could you return the form with your cheque to her by 31st March to ensure that you get a programme card of our new year's lectures and events at the April meeting.

Shakespeare in Stratford on Avon

An exciting visit to see Othello at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre, and a discussion with the two main leading actors, is planned for the evening of 27th August with the discussion the following morning, 28th August. Booking is open and tickets must be paid for by the end of March, so anyone interested, please, reply to this email as soon as possible and ask for a booking form. This is going to a production that attracts a huge amount of interest and publicity and we are extremely lucky to have access to a private meeting with Hugh Quarshie and Lucian Msamati.

Hugh Quarshie
Hugh Quarshie

Inventing Impressionism

Our first visit of the year is to the National Gallery to see Inventing Impressionism on 12th May. Details have been sent out and we hope that we can fill the coach to this exhibition, which include the works of Monet and Renoir among others. Please book quickly as tickets have to be paid for in advance.

Monet Poplars
Monet Poplars

 

Visiting London? 

There is a new exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery on the work of John Singer Sargent that runs until 25th May. The Guardian writes of a “scintillating exhibition of this formidable artist” and of how “he combined the tour de force brushwork he learned from the French with an acute interest in human psychology". You may have time to visit the NPG on the day of our visit to the National Gallery on 12th May but separate booking is advisable.

Portrait by John Singer Sargent
Portrait by John Singer Sargent

 

Acting Vice Chair

Henry Gowman who kindly came forward after the AGM to become our Acting Vice Chair has found that he now does not have the time needed to commit to the role due to the many other activities that he is involved in running. Madeline Weston has stepped into the breach and will be Acting Vice Chair until the AGM.  Many thanks to her and to Henry for volunteering!

Homage to Manet

There is a major new exhibition at Norwich Castle Museum and Art Gallery: Homage to Manet, which runs until 19th April 2015. Manet is considered the forefather of modern art and central to the exhibition is Manet’s stunning Portrait of Mademoiselle Claus. Works by fellow artists Claude Monet, John Singer Sargent, Walter Sickert and Philip Wilson Steer help to trace the influences of Manet to the art world.

Manet, Portrait Of Mademoiselle Claus
Manet, Portrait Of Mademoiselle Claus

 

Art Fair East, 5th-7th June 2015

This is a new art fair for the East of England. Knowledgeable dealers and artists are being assembled to help visitors build a superb collection of visual art from the UK and overseas. The first fair takes place in Saint Andrews Hall, St Andrew Plain, Norwich, NR3 1AU

Your entry ticket is below. Please click on the image below to view and print this page and cut it out for free admission.

Art exhibition at the Forum

Glaven Valley DFAS are mounting an exhibition of art produced by three of their local sixth forms, which they are sponsoring as part of their Young Arts programme. It takes place at The Forum from 22nd to 27th March.

Recent Lectures

Our January lecture concentrated on Piero di Cosimo, an enigmatic Florentine Renaissance painter. Not much is known about him but he was born in 1462 and he was the first painter to depict landscapes in the background of religious works. He was a contemporary of Leonardo da Vinci and Botticelli and was well respected by his contemporaries. As well as religious works he painted mythological panels; Shirley Smith’s excellent slides and captions enabled us to compare his work with other artists of his time. He was an artist who loved intricate detail but he was out of step with current trends. His lovely portrait of Simonetta Vespucci is mysterious and strange, depicting her with a snake around her neck as she had died at the young age of twenty-two. It is perhaps his most famous work.

Simonetta Vespucci by Piero di Cosimo
Simonetta Vespucci by Piero di Cosimo

February brought us fun and frolics in the shape of The Rise and Fall of the English Music Hall. Andrew Davies entertained us with the social history, examination of the architecture and the design associated with this very English activity. From its beginnings in the early 19th century, when enterprising publicans realised that by supplying entertainment along with drinking they could vastly increase their income, to the rise of professional entertainers, we looked at some of the establishments and stars of the business. The Canterbury Arms in Lambeth was the first important music hall, and then the Theatres of Variety, which sounded more genteel, appealed to a rising middle class. By 1912 they had become socially acceptable, so much so that there was a Royal Command performance at the London Coliseum; Marie Lloyd, although immensely popular, was excluded on the grounds that she was too cheeky. The demise of the music hall coincided with the coming of radio, moving pictures and then television, and many of the ornate buildings were pulled down, but Wilton's Music Hall, off Cable Street in London, has survived and been restored.

Wilton’s Music Hall
Wilton’s Music Hall